Construction company in Twickenham

Education (read also about the construction company in Twickenham)
Richmond upon Thames College, a College of General Further and Higher Education, is on Egerton Road in Twickenham. Construction company in Twickenham

Transport (construction company in Twickenham)

construction company in Twickenham

construction company in Twickenham

Until 1971 London Transport operated a bus depot known as “Twickenham Garage” (coded AB) which was located in Cambridge Road, East Twickenham. The relevant destination blind for garage journeys always referred to this location as Richmond Bridge, which was close by. On closure, all its routes and vehicles were transferred to Fulwell bus garage, but the building remained under the ownership of London Transport until the mid-1990s when it was demolished to make way for a housing development.

Fulwell Garage was previously known as Fulwell Depot and was originally the base for London United Tramways in south west London. The trams were replaced by trolleybuses that started operating from Fulwell Depot in the 1930s. The trolleybuses were later replaced by AEC Routemaster buses and London’s last trolleybus terminated here on the night of 8 May 1962, following a commemorative circuit of the Fulwell routes by London’s first trolleybus, No.1 of the A1 class Felthams, known as “Diddlers”. This vehicle is preserved in working order.

Originally Twickenham station was situated on the western side of the A310 “London Road” bridge before the new station was opened on the eastern side. This accounts for roads named “Railway Approach” and “Station Road”, which now give no access to the station.

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Builders in Twickenham

builders in Twickenham

Nearest railway stations (read also about the builders in Twickenham)
The main railway station in the town is Twickenham itself, although St Margarets, Fulwell and Strawberry Hill stations are also in Twickenham. Stations in nearby towns (all, except for Richmond, once part of the former Borough of Twickenham) are:

builders in Twickenham

builders in Twickenham

Hampton railway station (construction company in Twickenham)
Hampton Wick railway station (builders in Twickenham)
Richmond station (extension builders in Richmond)
Teddington railway station (loft conversion builders in Twickenham)
Whitton railway station (kitchen extension in Whitton)

Governance
From 1868 the area was administered jointly between the newly formed Middlesex County Council and the Twickenham Local Government District board, with the passing of the Local Government Act 1858. Then in 1894 The Local Government Act 1894 reconstituted the area as Twickenham Urban District. In 1926 Twickenham was granted a charter of incorporation to become a municipal borough. Eleven years later the urban district councils of Teddington, Hampton & Hampton Wick merged with Twickenham.

In 1965 Middlesex County Council was abolished and replaced with the Greater London Council and the boroughs of Twickenham, Richmond and Barnes were combined to form the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. In 1986 the Greater London Council was abolished and most powers devolved to local boroughs and others to the Government and joint boards. In 2000 the Greater London Authority was set up and two-tier administration returned, but with the top tier having a much more limited strategic role.
York House (rear view from sunken lawn) (builders in Twickenham)

The borough council offices and chamber are located at York House, Twickenham and in the adjacent civic centre.

The Twickenham constituency in the UK Parliament includes the towns of Twickenham, St Margarets, Whitton, Teddington, Hampton, Fulwell, Hampton Hill and Hampton Wick. Since the 2015 UK General Election, the Member of Parliament has been a Conservative, Dr Tania Mathias. (builders in Twickenham)

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Lofts and extension in Twickenham

Twickenham

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Lofts and extension in Twickenham, and more (lofts and extension in Twickenham)

Twickenham is a leafy suburban area of south west London, on the River Thames in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames 10 miles (16 km) southwest of the centre of London. It has a large town centre and is famous as being the home of rugby union, with hundreds of thousands of spectators visiting Twickenham Stadium, the world’s largest rugby stadium, each year.

The historic riverside area is famous for its network of 18th-century buildings and pleasure grounds, many of which survive intact. This area has three grand period mansions with public access: York House, Marble Hill and Strawberry Hill House.

Another has been lost, that belonging to 18th-century aphoristic poet Alexander Pope. Among these is the Neo-Gothic prototype home of Horace Walpole which has given its name to a whole district, Strawberry Hill, and is linked with the oldest Roman Catholic university in the country, St Mary’s University, Twickenham.

Pre-Norman

lofts and extension in Twickenham

lofts and extension in Twickenham

(lofts and extension in Twickenham)
Excavations have revealed settlements in the area dating from the Early Neolithic, possibly Mesolithic periods. Occupation seems to have continued through the Bronze Age, the Iron Age and the Roman occupation. The area was first mentioned (as “Tuican hom” and “Tuiccanham”) in a charter of 13 June 704 AD to cede the area to Waldhere, Bishop of London, “for the salvation of our souls”. The charter is signed with 12 crosses. The signatories included Swaefred of Essex, Cenred of Mercia and Earl Paeogthath.

Norman (lofts and extension in Twickenham)
In Norman times Twickenham was part of the Manor of Isleworth – itself part of the Hundred of Hounslow, Middlesex (mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086). The manor had belonged to Ælfgār, Earl of Mercia in the time of Edward the Confessor, but was granted to Walter de Saint-Valery (Waleric) by William I of England after the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. The area was then farmed for several hundred years, while the river provided opportunities for fishing, boatbuilding and trade.

17th century (lofts and extension in Twickenham)
Bubonic plague spread to the town in 1665 and 67 deaths were recorded. It appears that Twickenham had a pest house (short for “pestilence”) in the 17th century, although the location is not known.

There was also a watch house in the middle of the town, with stocks, a pillory and a whipping post whose owner was charged to “ward within and about this Parish and to keep all Beggars and Vagabonds that shall lye abide or lurk about the Towne and to give correction to such…”.

In 1633 construction began on York House. It was occupied by Edward Montagu, 2nd Earl of Manchester in 1656 and later by Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon.

1659 saw the first mention of the Twickenham Ferry, although ferrymen had already been operating in the area for many generations. Sometime before 1743 a “pirate” ferry appears to have been started by Twickenham inhabitants. There is speculation that it operated to serve “The Folly”, a floating hostelry of some kind. Several residents wrote to the Lord Mayor of the City of London:

…Complaining that there is lately fixed near the Shore of Twickenham on the River Thames a Vessell made like a Barge and called the Folly wherein divers[e] loose and disorderly persons are frequently entertained who have behaved in a very indecent Manner and do frequently afront divers[e] persons of Fashion and Distinction who often in an Evening Walk near that place, and desired so great a Nuisance might be removed,…. (lofts and extension in Twickenham)

The Twickenham Green area witnessed a high-profile murder on 19 August 2004, when French woman Amelie Delagrange (aged 22) died in hospital after being found with a serious head injury (caused by battery) in the area. Within 24 hours, police had established a link with the murder of Marsha McDonnell, who was killed in similar circumstances in nearby Hampton 18 months earlier. Levi Bellfield was found guilty of both murders on 25 February 2008 (as well as a further charge of attempted murder against 18-year-old Kate Sheedy) and sentenced to life imprisonment. He is also suspected of a series of other unsolved murders and attacks on women since 1990, most notably the murder of Amanda Dowler, a teenage girl who vanished from Walton-on-Thames in March 2002 and whose body was later found in Hampshire woodland.

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